Features

Hopeful for a better future

The story of  Shah Gul Shah Gul, a 38-year old Afghan woman, and her husband have been struggling for many years to make ends meet for their family of eight children (six boys, two girls). But now, with the arrival of a reproductive cow courtesy of the TUP project, she is hopeful that things will start changing for the better.Click here

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A childhood memory inspires an idea

Story of Zahra Khadem Hussain It was a memory from her childhood, a sweet moment of her as a young girl playing grown-up with her mother’s sewing machine, that gave Zahra the idea and the hope for a better future. Now a grown-up, Zahra, 35 years old, lives in the Hala Chapan village of Mazar-e-Sharif in Balkh with her husband and her own three children. Not too long ago, she and her family were in dire conditions and her sweet childhood memories

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Clicking her way to success

Story of Maryam Yousufi Maryam Yousufi, a 29-year old Afghan woman, runs a photography studio in the Hala Chapan area of Mazar-i-Sharif. Maryam learnt and started practicing photography in Iran when she was single. “I met my photography teacher in a ceremony I was invited to,” said Maryam “ I started attending his classes and learnt it very quickly”.   Continuing her photography was one of her marriage conditions to which her husband agreed.

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Hunger and humiliation turn into hope

The Story of Reza Gul Before she was selected to participate in The Ultra Poor (TUP) program of MISFA, Reza Gul’s life was filled with hardship and violence. Reza Gul was identified among the poorest of the poor in Badakhshan, a province in the northeastern highlands of Afghanistan. She received a package of support including livestock, monthly stipend, health allowance, skills and financial literacy trainings, and regular coaching. The intervention

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A stonemason carves out a lucrative enterprise

Story of Ahmad Fayez Fayez, 30 years old, owns a stone processing and manufacturing factory that converts granite, marble and other types of valuable stones imported from Pakistan, China, India and Iran, into decorative home items, statues, and grave-sign stones. Upon completion of his high school studies, Fayez could not pursue a university degree as he felt a more urgent need to find a source of regular income. Fayez established his stone factory

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Giving up driving for dairy manufacturing

Story of Asadullah Nowadays, it’s hard to imagine Asadullah, being a taxi driver. A long-time client of First Microfinance Bank (FMFB), Assadullah, 40 years old , now has a thriving business, which has made him one of the biggest dairy product manufacturers and distributors in Kabul. He has a confined animal feeding operation and maintains a milk production life cycle with 25 heads of cattle. The fresh milk they yield gets distributed in most supermarkets

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Empowered by embroidery

Rozma, 48 years old and a native of Maidan Wardak, has come a long way since her family moved to Kabul only to escape Taliban-ruled Afghanistan in the late 1990s. While living as a refugee in Iran without financial means, she decided to learn skills in stitching, tailoring, wool knitting, and embroidery.Years later after the fall of the Taliban in 2001, Rozma and her family repatriated back to Kabul with no real livelihood prospects. She turned to

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Turning a hobby into a lucrative enterprise

Norzia, 44 years old, is among a handful of Afghan women, who run a small-to-medium enterprise independently, without the constraints of cultural norms.While most Afghan women struggle to even obtain their husbands’ and families’ approval to engage in income-generating activities, especially ones requiring work outside their homes, Norzia has been running her beauty business on her own for many years now.To Read More  ,Click here

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Sewing her way to her dream

Like many young Afghans, who grew up amidst a history of conflict, Hamasa, 20, years old aspired for a better future through education. She was keen on her studies, finishing high school in ten years, two years short of the normal 12 years. Click here

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Weaving out of poverty and into prosperity

Carpet weaving is a traditional vocation in Afghanistan, but for Jahangir, it means much more than that. It presented him a unique opportunity to ride on the skills he inherited from his ancestors and take his family on a flight out of poverty. Moreover, he managed to incorporate his own artistry into the family vocation, turning it into a profitable business and a sustainable source of income for multiple households.Click here

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Latest Publication

MISFA Annual Report

For The Year Ended 31 March 2017

MISFA e-Newsletter

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